DEAN'S FORUM
How Racism and Ableism Impact Teacher Student Relationships: Developing Culturally Sustaining Relationships in Schools

Building off the work of Teachers College, Columbia University's Racial Literacy Lecture Series, Dean’s Forums feature candid conversations on race, equity & education at the School of Education.

Date & Time:

Thursday, November 19, 2020
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Registration:

Admission:

Free

Location:

Virtual/Online

Registered participants will receive a Zoom link on the day of the Dean's Forum.

"How Racism and Ableism Impact Teacher Student Relationships: Developing Culturally Sustaining Relationships in Schools"

Join us at the November Dean's Forum for an open conversation on developing culturally sustaining relationships. It is widely accepted that relationships are key to student success. “No significant learning can occur without a significant relationship” (Comer, 1995). The presenters recently wrote a chapter (Neilsen Gatti, Odima, & Campbell, in press) that takes a deeper look at relationships, why they matter for students with disabilities, how authentic relationships are pivotal to student success and approaches educators use to develop relationships in culturally sustaining ways and as a force for justice. In this Dean’s Forum, the presenters will provide a summary of the research on teacher-student relationships, how it differs for students with disabilities, how systems of oppression show up in schools and classrooms and impact student outcomes, and finally strategies to develop culturally sustaining relationships in virtual and face-to-face school and classroom communities.

About the Speakers 

Shelley Neilsen Gatti, PhD. is an Associate Professor in special education at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota.  She completed her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Minnesota in 2001 and studied multi-tiered systems of support for young children at risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD) in urban settings. At St Thomas, she coordinates the license program in EBD and the teacher residency program in partnership with Minneapolis and St Paul Public Schools. Before coming to St Thomas, she worked in the special education department in Minneapolis schools, coordinated grants at the University of Minnesota, and was a special education teacher in Montana. She has been a long-time member of CEC, CCBD, and DEC and served on various state and national boards.  Dr. Neilsen Gatti’s current areas of interest include teacher preparation and evaluation through residency pathways and embedding culturally sustaining pedagogy across all sectors of education. Her most recent publications focus on aspects of residency teacher pathways and thriving and persisting in teaching.
 
 
Martin Odima Jr. is a special education teacher coach in Saint Paul Public School (SPPS) district in Minnesota. He is also an adjunct faculty member teaching undergraduate and graduate students the fundamentals of special education at the University of St. Thomas. Martin studied psychology at the University of Minnesota and completed his licensure and master’s degree in Special Education through the Collaborative Urban Educator (CUE) program at the University of St. Thomas. Martin Odima’s current areas of interest include educational equity, technology integration, inclusive practices for students with disabilities, and retention of teachers of color. Martin co-wrote a book chapter that focuses on teaching strategies for special education teachers to thrive and persist in a challenging environment.
 
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